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Travel to Quebec

Hard times call for good stories and there’s nothing better than a Travel Tale!

Most of us are sick to death of bullet points, statistics, and Power Point presentations.  We crave some kind of narrative that can transport us out of the everyday, a story that can cut through the constant clatter and chatter of doom and gloom.

Travel Tales are good at that. And they’re often purposeful too. If you’re not sure, check out our post on 10 Good Reasons Travel Tales Matter.

You can use Travel Tales for:

training

advocacy

issue awareness

grassroots lobbying

branding.

You can use Travel Tales to:

polish your public image

build community

publicize programs

attract tourists

fundraise.

In the coming days, I’m going to show you how.

And remember!

You can get your story out there using a variety of  media.

For example . . . we live in an age where it’s possible to tell your story in video form and make that video available on the Internet.

According to comScore, a leader in measuring the digital world, US Internet users viewed more than 14.4 billion online videos during the month of March 2009. And, in February 2011, 82.5% of the US Internet audience viewed a video online.

Take You Tube.

On a personal note, my video on Havana, Havana Blues Part 1, has had about 28,500 views on You Tube. Without trying. I doubt that I could sell that many print books. And imagine what might happen if I took the time to be thoughtful about attracting viewers and spent some time optimizing my metadata or using ads to attract an audience.

You all know about You Tube. But you may not be familiar with these stats about You Tube viewers. Here are the US user demographics:

Gender: 53% male, 47% female

Median age: 33 years

Location: fairly evenly distributed across the US

Married: 44%

College educated: 69%

Employed: 71%

Students: 15%

Median income: $74,000

This data is a wake up call for many of us.

Multimedia on the Internet is no longer reserved for geeks and nerds.

Multimedia — or digital media — is the communication channel of choice for many of us.  We like it because it facilitates the telling of our inner and outward journeys using a multiplicity of techniques — video, podcasting, online publishing. You can choose whatever appeals to you.

Over the coming months, Travel Tales Matter will supply helpful tools and blueprints for how to reach broad international audiences with your message.

I’ll cover everything from Facebook and Twitter to Skype and UStream along with all sorts of other subjects in between.

Your ideas and comments are important to me, so let me hear from you. Please share what you’re doing, so that ReynoldsWolfe can give you a shout out and showcase the most innovative ideas out there!

Are you a writer or a blogger?

Have you ever thought of putting your books, articles, or reports in the Amazon Kindle Store? Did you even know you could do that?

Well you can. Quickly, easily, and inexpensively.

You don’t want to go to the trouble? Well, you might want to think twice about it.

According to a press release from Amazon, for every 100 print books the company has sold since April 1, 2011, they’ve sold 105 Kindle books.

Here’s a link to the to the 3,350 results in Travel: Travel Essays & Travelogues.

Would you like to capture this market? Don’t be deceived by the low prices. Some of these authors are earning much more than they would if they had a hard cover best seller.

Too good to be true? I’ll let you in on how it works in a future post.

There is a catch of course.

To get readers you need to have an author’s platform. I’ll show you how you can build one.

Ordinary Stories is committed to providing the how-to that will enable you to put your work online in a venue that is just right for you whether you’re a writer, a blogger, a journalist, an oral historian, a podcaster, a video or multimedia slideshow producer, even a photographer. We’ve got you covered!

You’re fortunate to live in an age where it’s possible to get your Travel Tale online easily and affordably so that it can be noticed by large international audiences.

If you weren’t a travel lover, you wouldn’t be reading this blog. It’s time for you to pack your travel gear and join me. Together we can make sure that your Travel Tale Matters!

If you like Ordinary Stories, I hope you’ll subscribe to our e-mail list so that you don’t miss a single post. There will be occasional updates and special offers too. I’ll never share your e-mail address and that’s a promise. Most of all, I want to address your issues and concerns. Please be sure to comment and stay in touch.

 

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Want to Tell a Travel Tale? Be a Story Catcher

by Lisa Wolfe on March 19, 2013

Barn in Appalachia

Like many of you, I’ve never thought of myself as a storyteller. I guess I think I’m more of a “story catcher.” Like the “song catcher” in the movie. Remember her — Lily Perleric? The movie Songcatcher (2000) takes place in the first decade of the last century, and it tells Lily’s story. Lily was a brilliant musicologist, a Ph.D. who was denied a promotion at the university where she was teaching. Bitter and disillusioned, she decides on the spur of the moment, to visit her sister in Appalachia . To her amazement, she soon discovers a treasure trove of old Scots-Irish songs that have been handed down from generation to generation, preserved orally in the seclusion of the North Carolina mountains. As Lily treks into isolated mountain regions, she becomes obsessed by the rugged purity of the music, and the courage and endurance of the people. Before long, she finds herself torn between a desire to preserve the musical heritage of the mountain residents and a drive to share the music with the outside world. In past years, those of us who are “story catchers” may have felt that we were in the same either/or situation. Finding the story was much easier than finding a large audience for its telling. Luckily we can now do both! New digital tools enable us to record stories and transfer them to our computers — “catch” them if you will — quickly and easily. And the technological wizardry of the Internet allows us to inexpensively share them with broad and diverse global audience. Now we can all be “story catchers,” sharing the heritage stories of our families, neighborhoods, and cultural communities — even the people and places we meet on our travels. To me, that’s what oral history, storytelling, and travel tales are all about: catching stories, recording and preserving them, then transmitting them via the Internet to interested listeners and viewers around the world. In coming posts, Travel Tales Matter will show you exactly how you can do this — quickly and easily!

We at Ordinary Stories want to help you find your way as a storyteller and/or oral historian. Check in often for “how to” tips and tools that will help you tell your personal travel tales. Please be sure to write and share your interests and concerns. Your feedback and ideas are important to us! Add a comment or send us an e-mail: info@ordinarystories.com.

Photograph courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/dok1/ / CC BY 2.0

If you like Ordinary Stories, I hope you’ll subscribe to our e-mail list so that you don’t miss a single post. There will be occasional updates and special offers too. I’ll never share your e-mail address and that’s a promise. Most of all, I want to address your issues and concerns. Please be sure to comment and stay in touch.

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10 Good Reasons Travel Tales Matter

by Lisa Wolfe on March 19, 2013

Jose Fuster Tells A Travel Tale

From Homer in the 8th century BC to Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love in our current century, travel tales ignite our imaginations, satisfy our quest for adventure, and inspire us to explore our inner minds and our external geographies. They can be extremely personal, and — often — the tales we tell of our own journeys hold the greatest meaning.

10 Good Reasons Travel Tales Matter are listed below. You can probably think of others. Let me know if you do.

  1. Travel tales broaden our horizons by introducing us to the world’s great treasures.
  2. They raise our cultural and environmental awareness.
  3. They preserve community memory.
  4. They familiarize us with the ‘Spirit of Place.’
  5. They bring the world into our living room.
  6. They teach us the lessons of history and politics.
  7. They spur us to ‘do good.’
  8. They broadcast accomplishments.
  9. They serve as guides and help us design new travel itineraries.
  10. They transform our lives!

If you want to tell your own ‘tale’, come back often.

We’ll be providing lots of tools and instructions for how to produce slideshows, video, and podcasts.

If you don’t want to produce your own, we’ll be happy to do it for you. Just send us a comment with your contact information and we’ll be in touch!

Photograph by Lisa Reynolds Wolfe.

If you like ORDINARY STORIES, I hope you’ll subscribe to our e-mail list so that you don’t miss a single post. There will be occasional updates and special offers too. I’ll never share your e-mail address and that’s a promise. Most of all, I want to address your issues and concerns. Please be sure to comment and stay in touch.

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